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Mysterious places in Poland

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There are many objects and places in Poland which, due to their special features of mystery or mysticism, create an extraordinary map of unique tourist attractions. The variety of these places means that everyone will find something for themselves – treasure hunters, ghost hunters, lovers of scary stories, enthusiasts of natural peculiarities or simply tourists who like to go off the beaten track. Our trusted partner ITS Poland, a polish travel agency, helped us prepare a comprehensive list of the most mysterious and terrifying places in Poland.

Skull Chapel

The Skull Chapel is a small brick baroque chapel, situated between the free-standing belfry and the Church of Saint Bartholomew in Kudowa-Zdrój. There would be nothing strange in this sacred art object, if not for the fact that instead of stucco, plaster and limestone, its walls are decorated with… human skeletons. The entire interior of the chapel is lined with human remains – real skulls and bones. In total, there are over 3,000 of them. In the crypt, under the floor, there are another 21,000 human remains, filling it to a height of about 2 meters. This mausoleum of death makes a huge, slightly scary impression. While visiting the chapel, a shiver runs down your spine, and its exceptionally dark atmosphere makes this place remain in our memory for a long time. A visit to this place makes you reflect on the transience of human life. This is one of the greatest peculiarities of the Kłodzko Land, a phenomenon not only in Poland, but also on a European scale.

The largest Mofeta in Muszyna

The mofeta is a place where bubbles of carbon dioxide emerge from cracks in the ground – with a characteristic gurgling sound. The carbon dioxide that is released here is formed at considerable depths and, as it goes towards the surface, it saturates the waters, making them sorrels. Mofeta gases are mainly carbon dioxide (95%), but also nitrogen (3.87%), methane (0.67%) and oxygen (0.21%). The brown colour of the water in this place is due to the natural processes of iron carbonate hydrolysis with the participation of iron bacteria. The concentration of carbon dioxide is so high that no living organism can survive in the immediate vicinity due to lack of oxygen. Insects and birds die above the mofeta, and it happened in the past that even people choked in the nearby leaky cellars. Therefore, it is better to admire this miracle of nature calmly from a safe distance. Mofeta can be seen in the small town of Jastrzębik near Muszyna in Silesian Beskids. It is the largest in Poland and one of the largest in Europe.

Crooked Forest

The Crooked Forest is a popular tourist attraction all over the world. In 2019, the natural monument was listed by the Daily Mail as one of nine magical forests worth visiting. This amazing forest grows in Nowy Czarnów near Gryfino in the West Pomeranian Voivodeship. Over 100 trees are bent at an angle of approx. 90 degrees from approx. 20 cm above the ground, and the curvature of some reaches up to 3 meters. The height of all these trees does not exceed 11-12 meters. According to Professor Kremer the reason for the unusual deformation of the trunks was the cutting down of trees aged 6 to 10 years for use in Christmas trees. As the trees were left with the last lower branch on purpose, it continued to grow upright and with time it took on a characteristic, distorted shape. Unfortunately, unusual pines are starting to die slowly. Some of the trees had to be cut down. Go there as soon as possible with our Polish Travel Agency to see him yet.

Colourful lakelets

The colourful lakes are the most colourful attraction of the Rudawy Janowickie – a mountain range in Lower Silesia. Four lakes: yellow, purple, blue and black lie on the slope of Wielka Kopa summit. The colour of water in reservoirs is related to the chemical composition of the walls and bottom of workings. In the past, there was a German mine of pyrite, a substance used in the production of sulfuric acid, here. With time, the chemical composition of the bottom and walls of the excavations coloured the water filling them, giving it – depending on the concentration and chemical composition – different colours. This is how these phenomenal lakes were created. There is an educational trail between the lakes, which leads to the top of Wielka Kopa summit via the green trail. In 2011, the Colourful Lakelets took the third place in the poll of the National Geographic Traveller monthly – “7 new wonders of Poland”.

Elblag Canal

The Elblag Canal is the longest navigable canal in Poland, and at the same time a great example of technical thought at the time. It is the only route in the world on which ships not only travel on water, but also on carriages that run on rails. Built in the years 1844-1881, it is a monument of hydraulic engineering unique in the world, thanks to the active system of five historic slipways with the so-called dry ridge (ships and yachts, to overcome the difference in levels, are placed on carriages and dragged along the rails with steel ropes moved by a water wheel). The construction of the canal was intended to shorten the transport route of goods (wood, grain and other agricultural produce) from Warmia and Masuria (East Prussia) to the Baltic Sea and Gdansk. The canal is one of the biggest attractions of the Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship – up to 60,000 passengers a year used cruises on tourist ships. Every year, tourists can choose from a wide range of tourist cruises prepared by Shipping Ostróda-Elbląska. This unique monument of hydraulic engineering has the status of a historical monument, and in 2007 it was chosen one of the seven wonders of Poland in a poll by the Rzeczpospolita magazine.

Even more mysterious places

Are there any other mysterious places in Poland known to you? In every region, almost in every corner of Poland, there are amazing, peculiar and legendary places … So, let’s go! Today contact our trusted partner, ITS Poland, Polish travel agency, and discover mysterious Poland as soon as possible!

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